unknown tech

Unveiling the Best Unknown Tech Gems in the United States

In a world dominated by big-name tech companies and widely recognized innovations, there exist hidden gems waiting to be discovered. The United States, a hub for technological advancement, is home to numerous lesser-known yet incredibly impressive tech innovations. In this blog, we delve into some of the best unknown tech treasures that are making waves across various industries in the US.

Luminar Lidar Technology

While Lidar technology is not entirely unknown, Luminar’s approach to it deserves attention. Luminar has developed a cutting-edge Lidar system that boasts unparalleled range and resolution, making it ideal for autonomous vehicles and other applications requiring precise 3D mapping. With its potential to revolutionize transportation and urban planning, Luminar’s Lidar technology is undoubtedly a hidden gem in the tech landscape.

Atom Computing’s Quantum Computers

Quantum computing is often associated with major players like IBM and Google, but Atom Computing is quietly making strides in this space. Using neutral atoms trapped in arrays of optical tweezers, Atom Computing is developing quantum computers with the potential to outperform existing systems in terms of scalability and error correction. Their innovative approach holds promise for tackling complex computational problems across various fields, from cryptography to drug discovery.

Ginkgo Bioworks’ Synthetic Biology Platform

Ginkgo Bioworks is at the forefront of synthetic biology, yet many are still unaware of the transformative potential of their platform. By leveraging genetic engineering and automation, Ginkgo Bioworks can rapidly prototype and scale the production of bio-based products, including fragrances, food ingredients, and even COVID-19 vaccines. Their technology opens up new possibilities for sustainable manufacturing and personalized medicine, making them a hidden gem in the biotech industry.

Wright Electric’s Electric Aircraft

While electric vehicles have gained widespread attention, electric aircraft are still relatively unknown to many. Wright Electric aims to change that with its innovative propulsion systems for commercial aircraft. By eliminating the need for fossil fuels, Wright Electric’s electric propulsion technology promises to reduce emissions and operating costs for airlines while opening up new opportunities for regional air travel. With partnerships with major airlines underway, Wright Electric is poised to disrupt the aviation industry.

Gauss Surgical’s AI-powered Blood Loss Monitoring

Gauss Surgical has developed a groundbreaking AI-powered platform for monitoring blood loss during surgery, yet its technology remains under the radar for many. By analyzing images from surgical sponges in real-time, Gauss Surgical’s system provides accurate and timely feedback to healthcare providers, enabling more precise interventions and improved patient outcomes. With its potential to prevent complications and reduce healthcare costs, Gauss Surgical’s technology represents a significant advancement in surgical care.

    The United States is brimming with innovative tech companies pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, and while some may fly under the radar, their contributions are no less impactful. From advanced Lidar systems to quantum computers and electric aircraft, these hidden gems are shaping the future of technology and driving positive change across industries. By shedding light on these lesser-known innovations, we can appreciate the breadth and depth of America’s tech landscape and the countless opportunities it holds for innovation and progress.

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    WhatsApp’s New Privacy Feature: Blocking Screenshots of Profile Pictures

    Engineers at parent company Meta have suddenly initiated a global rollout of a new feature on WhatsApp. Users are now unable to take screenshots of profile pictures, thanks to a switch that has been quietly activated.

    The block works similarly to the privacy measures used by banking software and streaming services like Netflix. Its primary aim is to prevent instances of impersonation and harassment that have been plaguing the app.

    Numerous banks, including NatWest and Royal Bank of Scotland, have issued warnings to customers about impersonation scams on WhatsApp. These scams typically involve criminals posing as friends or family members, requesting urgent monetary assistance under false pretenses.

    GB News has reported on this development, noting that the update has been observed on Android devices. However, attempts to replicate the block on profile picture screenshots have yielded mixed results, suggesting that the rollout is still in progress worldwide.

    When trying to capture a profile picture in fullscreen, users will encounter an error message preventing them from taking a screenshot. Instead of the intended image, they will end up with a blank screen shot.

    “Can’t take a screenshot due to app restrictions,” a notification will display at the bottom of the screen, indicating the limitation imposed by the new feature.

    WhatsApp’s recent update builds on its history of implementing privacy-focused features. Back in 2019, the app disabled the option to download and save profile pictures to deter impersonation attempts.

    Despite these efforts, scammers have continued to find ways around the restrictions, prompting Meta to introduce the latest update. The company hopes to curb impersonation, harassment, and bullying on its platform once and for all.

    By utilizing technology utilized by other mobile applications, WhatsApp is now able to prevent screenshots just like banks do with sensitive information. This measure is akin to the restrictions placed on capturing copyrighted content from services like Netflix or Disney+.

    The new update arrives shortly after Meta addressed a technical issue causing iPhone users to experience duplicate photos on WhatsApp. Now that the long-awaited screenshot block is in effect, the platform can focus on implementing other changes related to profile pictures within the app.

    Initial tests suggest that WhatsApp will soon allow users to share distinct profile pictures and usernames with specific contacts. This enhancement will build upon the existing feature that allows users to conceal their profile picture from unsaved contacts.

    Stay tuned for more updates as WhatsApp, under the ownership of Mark Zuckerberg’s Meta, continues to enhance its features and security measures to provide a safer user experience.

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    Privacy and Security on WhatsApp Introducing New Features

    Privacy security of user data are high on WhatsApp’s list of priorities and that perhaps helps the app remain one among the best encrypted instant messaging apps out there. The company recently starting testing a new label to emphasize chat encryption and other recently-released utilities already helps to keep your chats secure from prying eyes.

    Good examples which come to mind immediately are chat lock!, which allows hiding private conversations and app lock for WhatsApp, as well. A peek at the latest beta reveals the latter is in for a major upgrade and we couldn’t be more excited!

    If you want to secure your conversations with biometric authentication, WhatsApp offers two ways – the first is to hide private chats from the main chat lists by enabling chat lock on a per-conversation basis. Once activated, you’ll have to pull down on your chat list, like when refreshing a webpage; and you’ll see an option for Locked chats appear at the top of the list. The app will request authentication by face or fingerprint when you try to unlock.

    If you have a work phone where all the chats must be protected, you’re better off setting up an app lock. The feature is offered at a device level in several Android skins by major OEMs, but Meta’s chat app has its own version built in as well.

    While combing through the latest WhatsApp beta, version 2.24.6.20, the sleuths at WABetaInfo discovered app lock is expanding beyond just biometric fingerprint authentication to include other unlock methods such as face unlock, and device passcodes. The change would help people set up the feature even if they don’t prefer fingerprint unlock or if they’re using an affordable Android device which lacks reliable biometric sensors.

    Multiple authentication methods also help serve as backups for fingerprint authentication; like on that day when you’re wearing gloves but need to unlock the app. The update also improves the accessibility with app lock, because some people may be unable to use some of the available authentication methods.

    While this is a big step up from the current implementation of WhatsApp’s lock feature, WABetaInfo cautions against installing the latest beta to try the feature before a wider release. That’s because the current beta version is prone to crashes, and that could compromise the app’s core functions.